The Economy Looks Great. Will Trump Screw It Up With a Trade War?

Putting aside the coarseness and unpleasantness of President Trump, we are faced with a couple of objective facts about his economic policies. His policy of deregulation has removed the wet blanket from the economy that President Obama’s oppressive regulation and hostility to business caused. The tax cuts, particularly the corporate ones, are good for growth and will make US companies more competitive worldwide. At the margin, the tax changes will encourage more jobs at home and reduce the incentive for offshoring. That plus our cheap energy resources from the fracking boom create big tailwinds for the economy and could even draw back some manufacturing.

Growth is already strong and unemployment is low, so the average worker may be starting to see decent wage growth. And the economic expansion may have been given a new lease on life, though increased deficits and adding stimulus with such a low unemployment rate could lead to higher interest rates and inflation. These factors need to be watched, but tax policy combined with deregulation look to be very positive for the economy on balance.

Trump’s Trouble With Prosperity

But as we’ve seen with the President in the past, he seems to have a hard time handling prosperity. The one real threat to this Goldilocks moment seems to be his looming trade moves. A trade war will reverse all of the economic progress that has been made under his administration.

A trade war equals higher prices for consumers, screwed up supply chains, retaliatory actions by other countries, inflation, and a potential downward spiral like with the Smoot-Hawley Tariff, which deepened and lengthened the Great Depression.

To protect industries that can’t compete, he will raise prices on all consumers, which is a giant tax increase. America has much more to lose than gain from this. Expect farmers to be some of the first to feel the pain of retaliatory tariffs.

Trade Protection Feels Good, But Hurts You More Than The Other Guy

The problem with Protectionism is that it feels really good, but it ends up hurting you more. It is the economic equivalent of Mutually Assured Destruction. It likely ends in a feedback loop of retaliation that hurts everyone severely. Like burning down the house in order to save it.

Is Trump Really Smart Like He Says?

One of the President’s biggest problems is a lack of impulse control and thoughtfulness. I hope he will step back and think hard about the situation and the second and third order effects before he stubbornly undoes all of the good of his deregulation and tax policies. If he fouls up the economy with a trade war, that could likely be enough to push even loyal Republicans off of his bandwagon. I would think it would also make a major defeat for Republicans very likely this fall and increase the chances of his impeachment and potential removal from office in 2019. Don’t do it Mr. President. Discretion is the better part of valor in this case. Impulse control now!

See also:

The Infrastructure Boom: 5 Ways Investors Can Play It

Warren Buffett’s Annual Letter to Berkshire Shareholders for 2017

Complexity Bias: Why We Prefer Complicated to Simple

The Sustainability of Growth vs Return on Invested Capital

Excessive Diversification is Pointless & Damages Returns

Making History By Doing Nothing — Morgan Housel

“The whole trick in life is to get so that your own brain doesn’t mislead you.”
— Charlie Munger

“We want to do business in times of pessimism, not because we like pessimism but because we like the prices it produces. It’s optimism that’s the enemy of the rational buyer.”
— Warren Buffett

Larry Fink’s Convoluted & Coercive Solution to the Problems of Indexing

I am delighted to find businesses that are ethical and treat their communities and employees well as a matter of doing good while doing well. These businesses are rewarded in the marketplace for being good citizens and profitable. They are also what might be described as “long term greedy,” realizing that helping their community thrive will help their business in the long run.

It is a virtuous circle, and the moral nature of business and capitalism has a long history of being addressed by greats such as Adam Smith in both The Wealth of Nations and The Theory of Moral Sentiments, and theologian Michael Novak in his book The Spirit of Democratic Capitalism.

Larry Fink Wants to Use Coercion to Recreate Capitalism in His Image

Now Larry Fink of ETF giant BlackRock has demanded that CEOs institutionalize the pursuit of their “social purpose” and the welfare of all so-called stakeholders, and put this on par with making a profit for shareholders while serving their customers.

This seems to me to be a convoluted and coercive solution to the problem a Progressive investor might have with indexing. But, it is easy to solve this problem without turning our companies into social welfare agencies. Become a stock picker or hire one to sell the stocks of companies that don’t meet your standards, and buy the stocks of companies that do. But this would be bad for BlackRock’s index business, so Larry leans on coercion to force companies to abide by his ideals while he can still rake in the fees his company gets from having $6 Trillion under management.

His plan would distract companies and employees from their productive functions to make them hold meetings, write reports, and push paper so that they can show they are keeping up with a new kind of enforced corporate political correctness. Something tells me that value creation and serving customers and shareholders would take a back seat. Larry would have made a great regulator during the Obama Administration.

Don’t Kill the Golden Goose or There Will Be No Wealth to Redistribute

One of the things that has always dumbfounded me is that the Left is so hostile to capitalism. The reality is that wealth must be created before it can be redistributed. So a sensible Progressive should want the economy to do well and create as much wealth and prosperity as possible so they will have it to redistribute. Killing the Golden Goose means no more golden eggs.

If Larry needs to assuage his conscience for being a rich capitalist, why not simply give his money to causes that support his values like Bill Gates and Warren Buffett are doing? I guess it’s cheaper to spout nonsense and hang on to his dough. It doesn’t sound like he is living up to his social purpose. But then I guess that depends on who the judge is.

Putting layers of useless guidelines, regulation, and bureaucracy on society so people are spending most of their time shuffling paper and ignoring their productive functions is a recipe for economic malaise at best. Forgive me if I hope people like Mr. Fink are kept as far from the levers of real power as possible.

Where Are the Pragmatists? Two Parties Filled with Fringe Lunatics Doesn’t Leave Voters a Decent Choice

One of the things that stuns me in our current political reality is that both sides are kind of nuts and dominated by their extremes. As bad as Trump is in many ways, at least his policies are focused on unleashing the creativity of the American people through cutting the suffocating regulation of the Obama years. If the Democrats could decide to be pragmatic and business friendly, they could really have something going. But the Far Left seems in control and wants to pursue the socialist policies that Hugo Chavez used to destroy a prosperous Venezuela. Doesn’t seem very promising.

“I think part of the popularity of Berkshire Hathaway is that we look like people who have found a trick. It’s not brilliance. It’s just avoiding stupidity.”
— Charlie Munger

The Wisdom of Charlie Munger: You Have a Moral Duty To Be Rational and Reasonable, and To Eliminate Your Own Ignorance


Learning from the experiences of others will put you on the path to a successful life with fewer unpleasant detours. Charlie Munger is perhaps the wisest man alive. He is a man who has dedicated himself to understanding the world and figuring out what works. Pull up a chair and learn how to think and how to live.

A Conversation with Charlie Munger and Michigan Ross – December 20, 2017:

“What the pupil must learn, if he learns anything at all, is that the world will do most of the work for you, provided you cooperate with it by identifying how it really works and aligning with those realities. If we do not let the world teach us, it teaches us a lesson.”
— Joseph Tussman

Investing Equals Decision Making Under the Condition of Uncertainty


Recently upon finding out I invest for a living, an acquaintance asked me to let her know if I see something coming in terms of a big market selloff, because she is approaching retirement and is scared of a bear market. This is both typical and mystifying to me in terms of the way regular folks tend to think. The reality is that I don’t know the future any more than she does. Investing equals decision making under the condition of uncertainty.

How an Investor Should Conceive of the Future

To properly conceptualize the future as an investor, you need to create different scenarios and assign subjective probabilities to them. You want a strategy and an approach that is robust against this subjective probability distribution of the future. You can’t control your returns, but you can control your risk profile. Managing your risk requires balancing the probabilities against their potential consequences. As Seth Klarman has said, nothing is more important than the ability to sleep at night.

How to Approach Investing In an Uncertain World

An investor’s task is to manage their assets and cash flows so they will provide for their needs over their lifespan. How do you do that? You estimate what you will need and make a plan that is likely to get you to a prosperous retirement. Don’t extrapolate to the best case scenario. Prepare for the worst and hope for the best. But, the big thing is to save and invest something. Anything is better than nothing.

If you are young and investing for retirement, Vanguard suggests putting aside 15% of your income toward this goal. If you can meet that number terrific. If not, 10% is a reasonable goal when getting started. If you get an employer match, so much the better as this will decrease the amount you need to contribute.

You also want to make sure that you have enough in savings and disposable income to cover your living expenses during the portfolio building stage of your investing life. You don’t want to get disheartened or need cash during a bear market and either stop contributing or sell your investments at a loss.

Munger’s Approach to the Market’s Vicissitudes

Charlie Munger has said that he doesn’t try to predict the ups and downs of the market, he just tries to swim better than the tide. He has also said if you aren’t able to endure a decline in the quoted price of your stocks by 50% and react with equanimity two or three times in your life, then you deserve the mediocre returns you are likely to get.

I always get a kick out of market pundits who talk about how uncertainty is high right now. Uncertainty is always high. While trends persist, often far longer than you may think, recessions and bear markets many times begin when the consensus is fairly cheery. Anyone who tells you they know what is coming next in the markets is a liar, and they are probably trying to sell you something.

See also:

The Freakishly Strong Base and the Almost Magical Power of Compounding

The industrial economy is enjoying broad based growth

One Bitcoin Transaction Now Uses as Much Energy as Your House in a Week

The Innovation Is the Blockchain

“There are two kinds of investors, be they large or small: those who don’t know where the market is headed, and those who don’t know that they don’t know. Then again, there is a third type of investor — the investment professional, who indeed knows that he or she doesn’t know, but whose livelihood depends upon appearing to know.”
— William Bernstein

“The difference between a prediction and a probability is the difference between a pundit and a professional. One makes concentrated bets on the belief that they can predict the future and the other diversifies with the understanding that they cannot.”
— Charlie Bilello

“The question about selling a really great business is never. Because to sell off something that is a really wonderful business because the price looks a little high or something like that is almost always a mistake. It took me a lot of time to learn that. I haven’t fully learned it yet. It’s rare it makes sense. If you believe the long term economics of the business are terrific, it rarely makes any sense to sell it.”
— Warren Buffett

“Having, and sticking to, a true long term perspective is the closest you can come to possessing an investing super power.”
— Cliff Asness

A Survey of The Investing Horizon



So where do we stand with the stock market? The S&P 500 trades at just under 22 times trailing operating earnings according to Bloomberg …

… and 17.5 times forward earnings estimates according to J.P. Morgan.

So by these measures, the market is overvalued compared to 25 year averages. However, when the earnings yield is compared to current interest rates, the market is — if anything — rather cheap.

Ed Yardeni calls the current conventional wisdom the “2-by-2-by-2” scenario: 2% real GDP growth, 2% inflation, and a peak Fed Funds rate of 2%.

What If We Have Much Higher Interest Rates?

But much higher interest rates could upset the apple cart. While there are many reasons for lower potential growth and inflation — such as the aging of society — what if the conventional wisdom is wrong and higher growth and inflation cause a substantial increase in interest rates?

As the above chart shows, interest rates don’t generally have a negative effect on stocks until the ten year Treasury is above 5%. While it’s not impossible for rates to go higher than 5%, I see no reason for it to happen any time soon without much higher growth and/or inflation rates. And demographics and global trade would seem to keep a lid on both.

Runaway Inflation Seems Rather Unlikely

There are a lot of smart people who seem to think a normalized 4%-5% ten year Treasury yield is a reasonable planning assumption. For instance, Morningstar has a 4-5% ten year Treasury baked into its discounted cash flow (DCF) models to come up with their fair value estimates on stocks.

There is a lot of room between the current 2.24% on the ten year Treasury and a potential 5 handle. But with gradual Fed balance sheet reduction and possible higher growth from a tax cut or infrastructure package, the 10 year Treasury could easily reach 3%-3.5% over the next year or so — maybe even 4%. But that would require the Keystone Cops in Washington to get their acts together. And don’t forget the Fed is pushing in the other direction with higher short term interest rates because their outdated Philips Curve Model suggests inflation should be on its way any day now.

While commodities prices are mixed (weak ag prices/strong industrial metals), global trade should ease pressures on inflation. The official unemployment rate looks low, but there still seems to be some slack in the labor market with the low participation rate and wage growth below par. And to the extent wage pressures exist, companies will likely invest more in automation.

Maybe A Lot More Long Term Upside?

The good folks at Bespoke show that trailing 10 and 20 year stock market returns are still pretty lousy, which hardly seems an indication of a bubble ready to be popped.

And as this chart shows, we may well have entered a new secular bull market in 2013, which could bring huge gains over the next decade plus.

Can The Fed Control Its Urge to Cause a Recession?

So even though we’ve had a great 8 year run since the bottom in March of 2009, it seems we have room to the upside if the economy continues to do well. Unless we have a big geopolitical shock or the Fed hikes us into a recession. If we get a recession, we get a bear market. This is as close to a certainty as you will find in the markets.

While it seems everyone is looking for signs of the bottom falling out of the stock market, the data shows no bubble that I can see. Well, Tesla and Nvidia look rather bubbly but M&A and the IPO market are certainly not red hot. Big Cap Tech has had a great run, but they have real earnings and cash flows, and valuations are much more reasonable than during the bubble era. This is not about metrics like eyeballs and page views like 1999-2000. There is no sock puppet bullshit this time; by and large, they are real, substantial businesses.

It seems to me there is no need for a recession unless the Fed decides it wants to cause one by raising rates too much — so they can get the dry powder to lower rates in case of a recession, which they will likely cause by raising rates…

How To Plan For An Uncertain Future

If you are worried about a bear market, you should reduce your risk while times are good. Make sure you have enough liquidity so you won’t stop buying during a bear market if you are young and in the accumulation phase. And don’t sell into a decline!

Planning for your liquidity needs is even more important if you are in or near retirement. If you are worried about a coming bear market, you should sell down to the sleeping point now, when times are good. Don’t put yourself in a position to be a forced seller into a big decline. That only makes you fail to meet your long term goals while lining the pockets of guys like Warren Buffett and Seth Klarman.

I try to stay hunkered down all the time, and I plan for my liquidity needs as if a bear market will begin tomorrow. This is more sensible than to assume you will have some magical insight nobody else has that will enable you to sidestep the worst of a bear market.

See also:

J.P. Morgan Guide To the Markets as of June 30, 2017

“Run of the Mill” Market Returns – Bespoke

S&P 500 Remains Reasonably Valued – Brian Gilmartin

Jeff Saut Still a Huge Secular Bull

“Success in investing doesn’t correlate with I.Q. once you’re above the level of 125. Once you have ordinary intelligence, what you need is the temperament to control the urges that get other people into trouble in investing.”
— Warren Buffett